March 25, 2022
Journal Article

Distinctive carbon repression effects in the carbohydrate-selective wood decay fungus Rhodonia placenta

Abstract

Brown rot fungi dominate the carbon degradation of northern terrestrial conifers. These fungi adapted unique genetic inventories to degrade lignocellulose and to rapidly release a large quantity of carbohydrates for fungal catabolism. We know that brown rot involves “two-step” gene regulation to delay most hydrolytic enzyme expression until after harsh oxidative pretreatments. This implies the crucial role of concise gene regulation to brown rot efficacy, but the underlying regulatory mechanisms remain uncharacterized. Here, using the combined transcriptomic and enzyme analyses we investigated the roles of carbon catabolites in controlling gene expression in model brown rot fungus Rhodonia placenta. We identified co-regulated gene regulons as shared transcriptional responses to no-carbon controls, glucose, cellobiose, or aspen wood (Populus sp.). We found that cellobiose, a common inducing catabolite for fungi, induced expression of main chain-cleaving cellulases in GH5 and GH12 families (cellobiose vs. no-carbon > 4-fold, Padj

Published: March 25, 2022

Citation

Zhang J., L. Markillie, H.D. Mitchell, M.J. Gaffrey, G. Orr, and J.S. Schilling. 2022. Distinctive carbon repression effects in the carbohydrate-selective wood decay fungus Rhodonia placenta. Fungal Genetics and Biology : FG & B 159. PNNL-SA-170453. doi:10.1016/j.fgb.2022.103673

Research topics