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Atmospheric Sciences and Global Change
  • Xiao-Ying Yu and Yufan Zhou

    Yu, Zhu Research Graced Chemical Communications Back Cover

    Research work by Dr. Xiao-Ying Yu and her team landed on the back cover of the journal Chemical Communications. Yu and Dr. Zihua Zhu of PNNL in collaboration with Prof. Songqin Liu at Southeast University, China, discovered transient species and reaction pathways not covered in textbooks.

  • Artistic representation of SALVI

    Imaging Results Are Ones for the Books

    Scientists now have new insights into solid-liquid interface phenomena that go far beyond the textbook description. Researchers at Pacific Northwest National Laboratory developed a way to measure this common electrochemical system interface in place and in real time-a previously impossible task. Their work was showcased in the September 21 issue of Chemical Communications and featured on the journal's back cover.

  • TCAP ARM mobile facility, study data

    Atmospheric Mixed Messages

    Researchers at PNNL and collaborators unraveled processes that contribute to atmospheric particles' vertical motion and distribution to better represent them in a climate model. While the high-resolution regional model produced stronger vertical motions and captured the structure of the layers and concentrations in the free troposphere, the team warned that using regionally refined domains does not entirely solve the misrepresentation of these particles in a global context.

  • Dr. Will Shaw

    Shaw Appointed to JRSE Editorial Advisory Board

    Congratulations to atmospheric scientist and wind energy expert Dr. Will Shaw. He was appointed to the Editorial Advisory Board of the Journal of Renewable and Sustainable Energy. Shaw will contribute to consultation sessions as part of the Journal's peer review process and guidance on special issues, perspective articles and other content. He will serve a 3-year term.

  • BVOCs emitted into the atmosphere

    Capturing those Beguiling BVOCs

    Researchers at Pacific Northwest National Laboratory and their collaborators used a "mash-up" of several models to simulate BVOCs and compare them to real-life observations. The coupled system reasonably simulated the BVOCs, and using sensitivity experiments they showed that land surface formulas in the models do influence how BVOCs are simulated, but the impact is much smaller than the influence of vegetation distribution.

How do human activities and natural systems interact to affect the Earth's climate? Ultimately, that is the question challenging scientists in PNNL’s Atmospheric Sciences & Global Change Division.

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