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SEPTEMBER 14, 2020
Web Feature

VOLTTRON™ Goes to School

The PNNL-developed VOLTTRON™ software platform’s advancement has benefited from a community-driven approach. The technology has been used in buildings nationwide, including most recently on a university campus.

Dryland Expansion Regulates Variability in Plant Biodiversity

Image of low-lying scrub brush with mountains in the background.

Model shows quantified impact of accelerated dryland expansion on its productivity

August 27, 2020
August 27, 2020
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The Science

Drylands, such as grasslands, savannas, and deserts, are expected to expand and become more arid at an accelerating rate over the next century. The effects of this expansion and degradation on their gross primary production (GPP) remain elusive. A recent paper in Nature Communications is the first to quantify the impact of accelerated dryland expansion on their productivity. In addition, as different subtypes of drylands expand and convert, large changes will be seen in how regional and subtypes contribute to variability in global dryland productivities.

The Impact

Drylands are the largest source of interannual variability in the global carbon sink. Any changes in dryland ecosystems under climate change would have large implications for global carbon cycle. This work improves our understanding of how accelerated dryland expansion impacts the productivity of drylands. Dryland expansion and climate-induced conversions among sub-humid, semi-arid, arid, and hyper-arid subtypes will lead to substantial changes in regional and subtype contributions to global dryland GPP variability.

Summary

Drylands, such as grasslands, savannas, and deserts, cover approximately 41% of the Earth’s land surface and support more than 38% of the global population. Global dryland ecosystems with high plant productivity account for approximately 40% of global land net primary production (NPP.) They also act as the dominate global land CO2 sink and, over recent decades, have contributed the largest amount of net CO2 flux affecting interannual variability.

To study the impact of accelerated dryland expansion and degradation on global dryland GPP, researchers from Washington State University and Pacific Northwest National Laboratory assessed MODIS GPP data from 2000-2014 and the CMIP5 aridity index (AI.) Results from the investigation shows a positive relationship between GPP and AI over dryland regions, with total dryland GPP increasing by the end of the 21st century by 12 ± 3% relative to 2000–2014 increases. However, GPP per unit dryland area will decrease with degradation of drylands. Such expansion and conversions among different subtypes of drylands will lead to large changes in regional and subtype contributions to variability in global dryland productivity.

Researchers in this study used a cubic fitting method to find the relationship between dryland GPP and CMIP5 AI data. With long-term GPP data, they analyzed the trend and interannual variability of dryland GPP into the future. To verify the accuracy of projected GPP data, the team compared projected GPP data to GPP data from 15 CMIP5 models. The results showed agreement with the modeling data in eight regions during the same period.

Dynamic Earth system models are essential to more fully understand dryland ecosystem–climate interactions.

Funding

This work is supported by the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office of Science, Biological and Environmental Research (BER) program as part of BER’s Subsurface Biogeochemical Research Program (SBR) at the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL.) We also acknowledge support by the Second Tibetan Plateau Scientific Expedition and Research Program (STEP), Grant No. 2019QZKK0602, the National Natural Science Foundation of China under grants 41521004, 41991231 and 41975075, the Foundation of Key Laboratory for Semi-Arid Climate Change of the Ministry of Education in Lanzhou University, the China 111 Project (No. B13045), the Fundamental Research Funds for the Central Universities (lzujbky-2017-it18.)

10.1038/s41467-020-15515-2

Research topics

Yao, J., Liu, H., Huang, J., Gao, Z., Wang, G., Li, D., Yu, H., Chen, X. 2020. Accelerated dryland expansion regulates future variability in dryland gross primary production. Nature Communications, (2020) 11:1665 | https://doi.org/10.1038/s41467-020-15515-2.

Secretary of Energy Advisory Board (SEAB) Report Recognizes PNNL Contributions

ML and AI

Report features how PNNL’s computing capabilities are affecting the nation’s security, science, and energy missions

August 25, 2020
August 25, 2020
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Contributions from researchers across Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) were recognized in the preliminary findings of a Secretary of Energy Advisory Board (SEAB) report from a working group dedicated to the U.S. Department of Energy’s (DOE’s) capabilities and future in artificial intelligence (AI) and machine learning. PNNL researchers’ expertise is prominent throughout DOE’s AI efforts, particularly in the areas of data sciences and national security.

Based largely on input from DOE sponsors, the report features how PNNL’s computing capabilities are affecting the nation’s security, science, and energy missions. Key highlights include:

  • Studying how AI affects the global landscape for securing nuclear materials, potentially using deep learning to enhance physical and digital protections against material concealment, delivery, theft, and sabotage.
  • Describing how the United States and its partners might employ deep learning to combat attack efforts for enhanced nuclear security.
  • Designing advanced deep learning models to characterize operations with buildings, using electrical signatures on power lines, enabling new designs for energy-efficient buildings in addition to enhanced security features for nuclear facilities.
  • Leading the nuclear explosive monitoring project with data scientists working to significantly lower detection thresholds of low-yield, evasive underground nuclear explosions without increasing time-to-detection or the amount of human analysis.
  • Co-design of advanced accelerator, memory and data movement concepts to support convergence of AI and machine learning methods with other forms of data analytics and traditional scientific high performance computing (HPC). 

The report highlights PNNL’s support to the National Nuclear Security Administration, featuring joint laboratory collaborations between PNNL and others, including the Y-12 National Security Complex, Sandia National Laboratories, Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, Los Alamos National Laboratory, and Oak Ridge National Laboratory. Additionally, PNNL is working as part of DOE’s comparative advantages in AI, providing the Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy access to AI subject matter experts.

View full preliminary findings of the Secretary of Energy Advisory Board (SEAB) report.

For more information about PNNL’s research contributions, contact Aaron Luttman

Making Sense of the 2018 National Biodefense Strategy

July 23, 2020
July 23, 2020
Journal Article

Following the release of the 2018 National Biodefense Strategy, PNNL released a second-generation, publicly available tool—free for use at https://bplat.pnnl.gov—that maps out current biodefense responsibilities and brings clarity to the tangle of laws, directives, and agencies that together protect US citizens. The Biodefense Policy Landscape Analysis Tool, or B-PLAT, is affectionately called the “spaghetti monster,” because it visualizes information using spaghetti-like strands to demonstrate relationships between agencies, their specific responsibilities, and the degree of complexity and interconnectedness of the biodefense policy domain.

RA Bartholomew and KM Omberg.  “Making Sense of the 2018 National Biodefense Strategy.” Bulletin of the Atomic Scientists.  January 2019.  https://thebulletin.org/2019/01/making-sense-of-the-2018-national-biodefense-strategy/ 

January 18, 2019

A Publicly Available Landscape Analysis Tool for Biodefense Policy

July 23, 2020
July 23, 2020
Journal Article

In 2017, Pacific Northwest National Laboratory chartered an internal effort to capture relevant federal biodefense policy directives and laws in a format conducive to visualization and to better understanding the current state of the US biodefense enterprise.The resulting Biodefense Policy Landscape Analysis Tool (B-PLAT) is publicly available and captures more than 200 enduring biodefense responsibilities assigned by the following directives and laws.

10.1089/hs.2017.0088

KM Omberg, LR Franklin, DR Jackson, KL Taylor, KL Wahl, A Lesperance,  EM Wynkoop, JAS Gray, OP Leiser, SL Frazar, RM Ozanich , and RA Bartholomew. “A Publicly Available Landscape Analysis Tool for Biodefense.” Health Security. February 16(1): 2018.  DOI:  10.1089/hs.2017.0088

February 1, 2018
JULY 14, 2020
Web Feature

Turning the Tides

Their consistency and predictability makes tidal energy attractive, not only as a source of electricity but, potentially, as a mechanism to provide reliability and resilience to regional or local power grids.
APRIL 21, 2020
Web Feature

Beneath It All

At PNNL, subsurface science inhabits two separate but interlocking worlds. One looks at basic science, the other at applied science and engineering. Both are funded by the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE).