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Filtered by Advanced Hydrocarbon Conversion, Chemical Physics, Emergency Response, Integrative Omics, Precision Materials by Design, Radiation Measurement, Transmission, and Wind Energy
FEBRUARY 25, 2020
Web Feature

Forces of Attraction

Weak forces are strong enough to align semiconductor nanoparticles; new understanding may help make more useful materials

PNNL Launches Marine Renewable Energy Database

Logo of Tethys Engineering

PNNL created an online database to share information related to the marine renewable energy industry.

Tethys Engineering addresses industry’s technical and engineering challenges

November 18, 2019
November 18, 2019
Highlight

Marine renewable energy (MRE) has the potential to provide 90 gigawatts of power in the United States through waves and tidal and ocean currents.

To harness the ocean’s energy, the MRE industry needs to understand how to address technical and engineering challenges such as efficient power takeoff, device survivability, and grid integration.

PNNL developed Tethys Engineering in September 2019 to allow sharing resources around the deployment of devices in corrosive, high-energy marine environments. The recently launched Tethys Engineering online database includes collected and curated documents surrounding the technical and engineering development of MRE devices. Users can search and filter results to intuitively identify information relevant to developers, researchers, and regulators.

Tethys Engineering includes more than 3,000 journal articles, conference papers, reports, and presentations related to wave, current, salinity gradient, and ocean thermal energy conversion technologies. The database contains information from around the world.

The Tethys Engineering database was created as a companion to the already established Tethys website, which focuses on the environmental effects of the MRE industry.

November 18, 2019

Data Assimilation Impact of In Situ and Remote Sensing Meteorological Observations on Wind Power Forecasts during the First Wind Forecast Improvement Project (WFIP)

July 1, 2019
September 26, 2019
Journal Article

During the first Wind Forecast Improvement Project (WFIP) new meteorological observations were collected from a large suite of instruments, including wind velocities measured on networks of tall towers provided by wind industry partners, wind speeds measured by cup anemometers mounted on the nacelles of wind turbines, and by networks of Doppler sodars and radar wind profilers. Previous data denial studies found a significant improvement of up to 6% RMSE reduction for short-term wind power forecasts due to the assimilation of all of these observations into the NOAA Rapid Refresh (RAP) forecast model using a 3dvar GSI data assimilation scheme. As a follow-on study, we now investigate the impacts of assimilating into the RAP model either the additional remote sensing observations (sodars and wind profiling radars) alone, or assimilating the industry provided in situ observations (tall towers and nacelle anemometers) alone, in addition to the standard meteorological data sets that are routinely available. The more numerous tall tower/nacelle observations provide a relatively large improvement through the first 3-4 hours of the forecasts, which however decays to a negligible impact by forecast hour 6. In comparison the less numerous vertical profiling sodars/radars provide an initially smaller impact that decays at a much slower rate, with a positive impact present through the first 12 hours of the forecast. Large positive assimilation impacts for both sets of instruments are found during daytime hours, while small or even negative impacts are found during nighttime hours.

Wilczak J.M., J. Olson, I. Djalaova, L. Bianco, L.K. Berg, W.J. Shaw, and R.L. Coulter, et al. 2019. "Data Assimilation Impact of In Situ and Remote Sensing Meteorological Observations on Wind Power Forecasts during the First Wind Forecast Improvement Project (WFIP)." Wind Energy 22, no. 7:932-944. PNNL-SA-132499. doi:10.1002/we.2332

JUNE 26, 2019
Web Feature

Tough Materials for Tough Environments

Researchers apply numerical simulations to understand more about a sturdy material and how its basic structure responds to and resists radiation. The outcomes could help guide development of the resilient materials of the future.
MAY 6, 2019
Web Feature

Designer Defects in Diamonds

Researchers have come up with a new method for creating synthetic “colored” nanodiamonds, a step on the path to realization of quantum computing, which promises to solve problems far beyond the abilities of current supercomputers.