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Computational Sciences & Mathematics Division
Research Highlights

December 2010

Check Out the Fundamental & Computational Sciences Achievements for 2010

2010 Accomplishment Report Cover Accomplishment Report for Fiscal Year 2010

In fiscal year 2010, the staff of the Fundamental & Computational Sciences Directorate advanced the scientific frontiers to transform our understanding and control of chemical, physical, and biological processes as well as unravel important energy, environmental, and security challenges. These discoveries and solutions are highlighted in our key accomplishment report. For example, our scientists. . .

  • Discovered a critical link between the size of dust particles in clouds and their likelihood to produce rain, valuable data to those modeling the planet's changing climate.
  • Reconstructed the metabolic network of Shewanella oneidensis, opening doors to using the microbe to produce biofuels.
  • Synthesized a new class of highly selective catalytic materials for reactions of industrial importance.
  • Demonstrated the scalability of high-level excited-state coupled-cluster approaches and parallel-in-time algorithms needed to attack questions that require peta-scale supercomputers.

Further, our people were recognized for their achievements. For example, William Gustafson, Wei-Jun Qian, and Wendy Shaw received early career research awards from the Department of Energy. Guang Lin earned a 2010 Advanced Scientific Computing Research leadership challenge award, which provides him with computational resources for high-risk, high-reward simulations. Alexandre Shvartsburg, Keqi Tang, Richard Smith, Tom Weber, and Colette Sacksteder won 2010 R&D 100 Awards for two of the top high-tech products of the year.

Copies of this full-color accomplishments report are available online.


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