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PNNL scientist leads ASTM International committee, wins Anderson Award

May 10, 2004 Share This!

RICHLAND, Wash. – Gary L. Smith, a staff scientist at the Department of Energy's Pacific Northwest National Laboratory, has been appointed chair of the ASTM International Committee C26 on Nuclear Fuel Cycle. This prominent and influential committee develops standards important to work done on the nuclear fuel cycle, including spent nuclear fuel, waste materials and repository waste packaging and storage. Smith also was honored with the Harlan J. Anderson Award which is presented annually to a member of C26 who has made outstanding contributions toward the successful operation of the Committee.

Smith has more than 23 years of experience in the fields of ceramics and material science and engineering. For the last 10 years he has been working primarily in nuclear waste and vitrification. He has over 50 publications and has co-edited three Ceramic Transactions volumes, published by the American Ceramic Society.

Smith is currently assigned to the Hanford Waste Treatment Plant near Richland to ensure the development and use of simulants is coordinated, consistent and defensible across the Project and into commissioning.

He earned a bachelor degree in chemistry from Occidental College in Los Angeles, Calif. in 1980 and a doctorate in material science and engineering from the University of Arizona in 1993. Smith is a Fellow of ASTM International and of the American Ceramic Society, and is also a member of the Materials Research Society.

Tags: Fundamental Science, Chemistry

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