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Five PNNL researchers elected Fellows by AAAS

November 23, 2006 Share This!

RICHLAND, Wash. – Five scientists from the Department of Energy’s Pacific Northwest National Laboratory have been elected Fellows of the American Association for the Advancement of Science. All five will be recognized at the Fellows Forum at the AAAS national meeting in San Francisco in February.

Each of the five honorees was elected Fellow in separate sections of the AAAS. James Fredrickson was elected a Fellow in biological sciences. Richard Smith and S. K. Sundaram were elected Fellows in the AAAS sections for chemistry and engineering, respectively. William Weber was elected a Fellow in physics, while John Zachara was elected in the AAAS section for geology and geography.

Election as an AAAS Fellow is determined by peer reviewers. Fellows are honored for “meritorious efforts to advance science or its applications.” AAAS began honoring its distinguished members with the title of Fellow in 1874.

James Fredrickson is a Laboratory Fellow and the Chief Scientist in the Biological Sciences Division of PNNL’s Fundamental Science Directorate. He is being recognized for “leadership in the field of microbial ecology and environmental microbiology, with emphasis on subsurface microbiology and biogeochemistry.”

He also serves as the Chief Scientist for the U.S. Department of Energy’s Genomics: Genomes to Life program and is the Subprogram Coordinator for DOE’s Subsurface Science Program. He has been with PNNL since 1985.

Fredrickson earned a bachelor’s degree in soil sciences from the University of Wisconsin-Stevens Point in 1978; and a master’s degree in soil sciences and a doctorate in soil microbiology from Washington State University in 1982 and 1984, respectively. Richard Smith is a Battelle Fellow and Chief Scientist in the Biological Sciences Division of PNNL’s Fundamental Science Directorate. He is being recognized for “leadership in analytical chemistry, specifically in the deployment of advanced separation methods with high-performance mass spectrometry for high-throughput proteomics.”

He also serves as the director of the National Institute for Health Research Resource for Integrative Proteomics and is an adjunct professor of chemistry at Washington State University and the University of Utah; and an affiliate professor of chemistry at the University of Idaho.

Smith earned a bachelor’s degree in chemistry from the University of Massachusetts at Lowell in 1971, and a doctorate in physical chemistry from the University of Utah in 1975. He joined PNNL in 1976.

S.K. Sundaram is the Chief Materials Scientist in PNNL’s Advanced Processing and Applications Group in the Environmental Technology Directorate. He is being recognized for “leadership and innovative contributions to a diverse cross-section of materials sciences, particularly new tools for synthesis and characterization of novel materials, diagnostics, and nanomaterials.”

He joined PNNL in 1994 as a post-doctoral fellow and then as a senior research scientist in 1996. He was named chief materials scientist in 2002. He also serves as an adjunct faculty member in the School of Mechanical and Materials engineering for Washington State University and has visiting appointments at MIT, Harvard, and Princeton.

Sundaram earned an AIICeram degree in ceramics and glass technology from the Indian Institute of Ceramics at Calcutta in 1983, a master’s degree in Materials Science and Engineering from the Indian Institute of Technology at Kharagpur in 1986, and a doctorate in Materials Science and Engineering from the Georgia Institute of Technology at Atlanta in 1994.

William Weber is a Laboratory Fellow in PNNL’s Fundamental Science Directorate. He is being recognized for “leadership and innovative research on defects, ion-solid interactions, and radiation effects in ceramics, particularly modeling and simulations of radiation damage processes.”

He joined PNNL in 1977. Currently he is the Team Leader for the Material Interfaces Group and serves as the Chair of PNNL’s Council of Fellows and the laboratory’s Publication Advisory Committee.

Weber earned a bachelor’s degree in physics from the University of Wisconsin-Oshkosh in 1971, and a master’s degree and a doctorate in nuclear engineering from the University of Wisconsin-Madison in 1972 and 1977, respectively.

John Zachara is the Senior Chief Scientist for Environmental Chemistry in the Chemical and Material Sciences Division of PNNL’s Fundamental Science Directorate. He is being recognized for “distinguished contributions to environmental science, particularly for his work on the chemical and microbial processes affecting subsurface contaminant transport at the Hanford Site in Washington State.

He is a chief scientist for in-ground contaminants at the U.S. Department of Energy Hanford Site on the Hanford Remediation and Closure Science project and is a member of the Stanford Synchrotron Radiation Laboratory (SSRL) Advisory Committee.

Zachara earned a bachelor’s degree in chemistry from Bucknell University in 1973, a master’s degree in soil and watershed chemistry from the University of Washington in 1979, and a doctorate in soil chemistry from Washington State University in 1986.

The honorees join 15 current PNNL staff members previously elected as AAAS Fellows. Founded in 1848, AAAS has worked to advance science for human well-being through its projects, programs and publications in the areas of science policy, science education and international scientific cooperation. Science magazine is the chief publication of the AAAS, reviewing and publishing many of the top research papers in the biological and physical sciences. Science was established by Thomas Edison in 1880, and has the highest paid circulation of any scientific journal in the world.

Tags: Energy, Environment, Fundamental Science, Subsurface Science, Chemistry, Biology, Mass Spectrometry, Proteomics

Interdisciplinary teams at Pacific Northwest National Laboratory address many of America's most pressing issues in energy, the environment and national security through advances in basic and applied science. Founded in 1965, PNNL employs 4,300 staff and has an annual budget of about $950 million. It is managed by Battelle for the U.S. Department of Energy. For more information, visit the PNNL News Center, or follow PNNL on Facebook, Google+, LinkedIn and Twitter.

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